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Desc:Eric Laithwaite demonstrates
Category:Educational, Science & Technology
Tags:physics, college, gyro
Submitted:Shoebox Joe
Date:03/29/13
Views:1847
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Comment count is 14
badideasinaction - 2013-03-29
Do you even lift?
Oscar Wildcat - 2013-03-29
This man is a golden God. Stars and Kisses, Shoebox.
Shoebox Joe - 2013-03-30
Is that compliment directed at me or the man with the wheel?

Thanks either way!

Meerkat - 2013-03-29
Neat!

I like the little rock star leg kick at the end.
Bort - 2013-03-30
HOT!

boner - 2013-03-29
Write that down in your copybook now.
Bort - 2013-03-30
You could write a hundred Silver Age Superman stories around the principle that things get lighter when you spin them.

So what's going on here -- the torque required to tilt the wheel is greater than 40 lbs, so angular momentum beats gravity? I'm also guessing the long axle lets the wheel travel through a long path as the guy spins around, meaning only a tiny bit of force gradually applied is enough to lift it.
fluffy - 2013-03-30
That's my guess as well, yeah.

EvilHomer - 2013-03-30
Sorcery. Sorcery and demons is what done it.

Bort - 2014-08-22
You know captain, every year of my life, I grow more and more convinced that the deal here is basic mechanical advantage. The spinningness of the wheel has two effects: it renders the apparatus essentially tip-proof, and it forces the wheel to travel in a big circle. So that means that, when the guy lifts the apparatus 12 inches, in reality the spinny part has traveled a much longer distance along a corkscrew path. That's textbook mechanical advantage: it's as if the guy were pushing the wheel up a long, corkscrew-shaped incline.

If you just take the time to look at it.

Bort - 2014-08-23
Oh, apparently that's not either. The trick is that he's pushing the thing "forward" as he releases it, and when you try to speed up the precession of a gyroscope, it responds by rising:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLMpdBjA2SU

Another counterintuitive result, brought to you by science.

memedumpster - 2013-03-30
This is so fucking cool that I can only imagine Spaceman Africa created six new accounts to vote it down with.
Spaceman Africa - 2013-03-30
I don't remember voting this down

exy - 2013-03-31
Physics
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