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Desc:Season 1, Episode 1. The debut of 'happy little tree'.
Category:Classic TV Clips, Arts
Tags:PBS, bob ross, Painting, happy trees
Submitted:Reefer Fez
Date:10/26/15
Views:969
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Comment count is 19
Reefer Fez
Damn, that flew through the Hopper!

They just released a bunch of full episodes on this channel. I don't paint, but I'll be checking them out.
memedumpster
Try painting, it's damned near as easy as he makes it look.

Bob Ross is auto-5&F.

EvilHomer
It's easy once you've been doing it for thirty years.

The Mothership
Every day's a good day with your paint.
BHWW
A most excellent hair-beard-glasses combo, the sort of aesthetic I would gladly promote/recommend.
That guy
But would you finance it?

Binro the Heretic
I probably wouldn't love art if it wasn't for Bob Ross.

Just about every other person I learned art from seemed to think art was a tightly-structured sort of thing. You had to use these tools. You had to use these materials. You had to make it using exact methods. Your artwork must follow precise rules of design.

Ross was the first person who ever taught me art should be enjoyable to make.
EvilHomer
In fairness to every other person, Bob Ross has a lot of rules, too. Within the first five minutes of this episode, he's told us: we need a specific sort of palette knife. We need a specific size of brush. What kind of bristles the brush should have. What color paints to buy. The type of easel we need. Odorless paint-thinner, not turpentine. How to start our painting - thick coat of paint, wet-on-wet. Et cetera.

Bob's brilliance was that he was able to come up with a very stripped-down, time-efficient method of painting; a way that people could belt out truly awesome looking landscapes, using a minimum of tools, in a brief amount of time. He's also a great instructor, in that he's quite charismatic and instills confidence, rather than fear or feelings of inadequacy, in his students. But I wouldn't say he's not a tightly-structured artist! He's *definitely* a stickler for the rules - his rules, but rules nonetheless.

EvilHomer
I should also point out that Bob Ross was incredibly conservative when it came to subject matter, and this conservatism rubbed off on many of his (more formal) students. What I mean by this is, Bob Ross made pretty much the exact same painting, over and over and over again. Here's an interesting article on Mr Ross' work:

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/a-statistical-analysis-of- the-work-of-bob-ross/

In particular, note the collage of his paintings {http://tinyurl.com/pwg3duz}. Bob was a great painter, but like Thomas Kinkade, he tended to stick with what worked for him. Now this wouldn't be so bad (everyone has their own favorite subject), except Bob never really showed his students how to paint anything BESIDES a "Bob Ross" tree-mountain-lake painting!

To his credit, Bob was always very encouraging, and constantly told his viewers to paint from their imagination: YOU have the vision, YOU have the power within yourself, etc etc. Unfortunately, unless your vision happened to include all the things which Bob Ross fancied - trees, mountains, lakes - then you were pretty much screwed.

Boomer The Dog
Thanks for adding the extra texture to the canvas of Bob Ross Homer. When I saw the subject I was thinking you might have an interesting comment on a fellow painter.

I used to watch and wish he'd put Dogs in his paintings, and he could have, but I never saw any when I watched. He'd make a scene of a lake's edge with a flat area that I thought a Dog could surely go, like a Lassie Collie looking out over the water.

I think he could have painted some kinds of Dogs, especially shaggier breeds like a tri-color Collie, the way their fur is textured and the way it lays would seem to relate to features he was already painting, such as tree bark and bushes.

Of course adding that Collie would take the viewer's eyes off of the rest of the picture and change the whole scene, so maybe he could have put the Dog on the shore and kept him small?

I don't know, I kind of think Bob Ross had to paint the way he did, or he'd be a whole new painter, putting people or larger animals in.

Have you seen the work of Joy Campbell? I was at my local Kuhn's supermarket and I like to always look for Doggies in the card racks when I go past, and a few months ago I saw an anthro looking bear bearing flowers with a happy look on his face.

I took a photo of the card, posted it to my radio's blog and made a fuss of it and then looked up the artist, thinking she did some cool stuff, and saving a number of jpegs of her work.

I can see a little of the Evil Homer painting look in her pictures, with animals in humorous situations. If you look up Joy Campbell animals, you'll find a few good pages of her pictures.

Boomer

Anaxagoras
I found a good article that argues that Bob isn't really that great a painter, in the sense that he didn't grow as an artist & didn't have much range. http://emptyeasel.com/2007/01/29/helpful-or-harmful-the-bob-ross-m ethod-of-painting/

It sounds about right. He was probably more important as an art popularizer than as an actual artist. But damn if he isn't an amazing popularizer. Hell, after listening to this, even I almost believed I could paint. And I know from past experience that I can't. I really, really, really can't.

EvilHomer
Hi Boomer, long time no bark. You missed a few good dog videos!

Anyways, I have not seen Joy Campbell, but I will keep an eye out! Also, thank you for your kind words, but I wouldn't really consider myself to be "a painter". I fuck around a little bit, but I've never been paid, and I'm not even a fraction as good as Bob Ross, let alone anyone better than Bob Ross.

Speaking of, I wasn't going to post this, but since you're here, I think you might get a kick out of the ceiling tile I am working on! It is a donation for a local restaurant; it's "Dogs Playing Poker" (specifically, the painting entitled "Waterloo"), only instead of playing poker, they will be enjoying a nice doggie pizza together (maybe it is topped with cow hoof and cat sausage?)

http://fav.me/d9elp9w

Boomer The Dog
Hi Homer, I think I got to some Dog videos here, but real late when they were almost off of the pages.

Great! Poker Dogs have to be one of my inspirations in the field of anthro Dogs, seeing a picture of them as a younger pup and doing double takes looking at it to see what was going on with the Doggies.

I didn't really understand what was being done to make them look that way, I didn't have an eye for the kind of details that make a picture like that work, but my pictures today have to echo something of the poker Dogs's style.

I see that you're sketching it out, it's like you have a portable piece of the Sistine Chapel.. :) Are you using grid lines to magnify the picture? It's cool to do art for a local establishment, lots of diners might get to see it. I hope it's worth free pizza to you!

I do think it's great that you paint as you do, I draw and do photo-manipulation to make anthro Dogs almost exclusively. If Bob Ross is cabin-tree-lake, then Boom is Dog-Canine-puppy.

Yes, Poker Dogs, that relates to what Joy Campbell does, scenes of animals with anthro expressions, visual puns, different species together in nature settings, pets indoors and out. I haven't seen any Humans in Joy's pictures yet, in a sense the people are the animals. Maybe in some pictures Joy is like a mix of Coolidge of poker Dogs and Bob Ross.

I saved your working picture I'd like to see the full one when you get it done, you could show it here or have Rainbow Dash write to me if you want.

Boomer

Boomer The Dog
I'd see Bob Ross on my local PBS station on lazy afternoons, home from school, no one else here, waiting for Sesame Street, that sort of thing.

Smooth talk and happy painting, and watching a picture get created before you in real time is nice. The easygoing, simple production of the show is so different than instructional videos now.

There's a lot to learn from this show, not just about painting.

Boomer
boner
I'm sure 99% of the viewers never painted anything. This was just the ultimate chill-out show.
Boomer The Dog
When I watched I thought that everyone else was painting along except me.

Anaxagoras
Holy shit. I had heard about this guy, but never seen him. He really *is* the most soothing man in the world. And from what I read, he seemed like a good guy: all the paintings he did, he donated to PBS stations. (He made his millions from his books or whatever.)
Boomer The Dog
Anaxagoras, decent article, and while there I read a few others.
Two Jar Slave
I painted along with Bob five or six times, long after he passed away. My then-girlfriend and I discovered his show on the internet. Painting with this blissful guy helped us through a tough time. I'll always have loads of love and respect for The Joy of Painting.

(It's a lot harder than he makes it look, but as Bob often says, "Don't worry; your painting looks like someplace in the world.")
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