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Desc:FINDING NIMO
Category:Educational, Science & Technology
Tags:SCIENCE!, electronics, Fran Blanche
Submitted:Albuquerque Halsey
Date:10/18/17
Views:979
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Comment count is 9
Chicken the Did - 2017-10-18
Her voice at the beginning reminds me of this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt8rfsm2mUE
OxygenThief - 2017-10-18
At this point all of our YouTube recommendations are slowing merging into a large, Akira-like mass.
Mr. Purple Cat Esq. - 2017-10-18
You mean Tetsuo-like?

Chancho - 2017-10-18
Thank you, I will be watching every video on her channel.
Boomer The Dog - 2017-10-18
Her and her Johnson.

That's fascinating.. I've never heard of that display before, and I read all kinds of older tech magazines and catalogs.

I like how enthused she is about NIMO technology too!

It might be the 'most dangerous', but high voltage handling was well established at the time, vacuum tube era techs knew it, and color TVs used anode voltages of 25 kilovolts at that time, and they were in many homes.

Boomer
betabox - 2017-10-19
Yeah, the video and the display are very interesting, but her horror at the voltage is a bit much. Tube circuits had higher voltages. This is higher than most consumer electronics other than televisions, but not alarmingly so.

It's also odd that she finds the light bulb projection display to be objectively superior, considering that she tells us that the CRT display needs only 7uA for control. That's a LOT less than a light bulb, and it would be a definite advantage depending on what you're using to drive it.

Boomer The Dog - 2017-10-20
I'd have to think they're efficient compared to incandescent segments of any kind, with one high voltage supply for long rows of the tubes, though there was a filament for each one, a few watts there. Probably the most efficient display at the time was Nixie, just a neon tube.

I like NIMO a lot, the biggest thing being the clarity of the numerals, clean and bright, better to have at the output of a computer, the space program or for nuclear plant monitoring.

Somewhere in my junk box I have Nixie tubes from a desktop calculator, and a set of two filamentary segment display tubes in a board, kept because they're a bit of history.

Boom

bawbag - 2017-10-18
Fran is awesome!
betabox - 2017-10-19
She seems to be.

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