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Desc:Those heartless millennials are abandoning yet another American institution
Category:Business, Fashion
Tags:cheese, American, Millennials, killer millennials, manufactured
Submitted:blase
Date:10/14/18
Views:733
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Comment count is 26
Born in the RSR - 2018-10-14
see, this is the kind of thing where I can't tell if it's satire or not.
Scrimmjob - 2018-10-14
Stars for the life or death tone of the music. Also American cheese is gross, and whatever the hell velveeta is, is even grosser.
Binro the Heretic - 2018-10-14
Velveeta, like "American" cheese is cheddar cheese mixed with oil & dye but with some seasoning added & way more oil.

Binro the Heretic - 2018-10-14
It's cheddar cheese mixed with oil & orange dye. It's no big loss.
Old_Zircon - 2018-10-14
Not true, I'm pretty certain there's no cheddar in there. It's dairy proteins and thickening agents as far as I know. There are some European countries where similar products aren't legally allowed to be called cheese at all.

Binro the Heretic - 2018-10-14
Same here in the US. Read the the labels and you will see American "cheese" is called "processed cheese food."

The original "processed cheese food" was a cheese spread produced by the original Mr. Kraft. Cheese makers sued because he was calling it "cheese spread" and they wanted it to be called "embalmed cheese." So "processed cheese food" was the compromise.

We went through a similar thing with potato chip manufacturers getting their knickers in a twist over Pringles.

SolRo - 2018-10-14
American fake foods have lots of those weaseling phrases to fool idiots into thinking it’s not a processed product or an outright imitation. just looking for maple syrup you’ll probably find 5 different descriptions on the imitation syrup products.

John Holmes Motherfucker - 2018-10-17
>>>The other explanation is that adults have less sensitive sense of taste than kids and are more tolerant of intense flavors

I don't know what is known about the phenomenon of acquired taste, but i don't think it happens in the mouth. I think it probably happens in the brain. Think of all of the tastes that you love that are acquired,. That could include uncooked sushi, pickled food, fermented foods, whole grains, spicy foods, alcoholic beverages, for some people smoking, Most of these are tastes acquired as adults. I've heard the taste of semen referred to as an acquired taste. Over the years, my palette hasn't become duller, but increasingly I desire complex flavors. Children simply haven't acquired many tastes in their young lives.

GravidWithHate - 2018-10-14
Here's Kenji Lopez Alt on American Process Cheese:

https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/07/whats-really-in-american-c heese.html

There are different sorts of American Cheese, some of which are very much cheese, others not.
Gmork - 2018-10-14
Kraft singles have always been gross garbage, but we need them to make proper grilled cheese. Probably the only legitimate use.
exy - 2018-10-14
Finally! a reason to feel grateful toward millennials
betabox - 2018-10-14
I reluctantly agree.

Mr. Purple Cat Esq. - 2018-10-14
I dunno if its the same thing but we have this cheese in Ireland called Easi-Singles

http://www.dailyedge.ie/easi-singles-cheese-2722901-Apr2016/
It quite plasticy and its also fucking awesome! and most beloved.

Apparently its made from cheesemaking by-products. Its like the stuff they skim off the top of the cheese vats.
You People Are Idiots - 2018-10-14
............................................................
whoa bold

SolRo - 2018-10-14
So only millennials get blamed for it? No article about ungrateful boomers refusing to eat a pound of velveeta every week?
John Holmes Motherfucker - 2018-10-15
There's a lot of confusion here, even the wikipedia entry seems muddled,

Kraft singles are "cheese food".
Velveeta is "cheese spread"

But there is an American Cheese that is all cheese, but it's "processed cheese", which is a combination of more than one cheese, one of which is usually cheddar. I get the feeling that some of you haven't experienced "real" American cheese. It's not bad, in my opinion. It's tasty, but it's mild enough that you can eat a lot of it. It's the cheese in your big mac and your egg mcmuffin. In the eighties, the government famously gave it away to the poor and elderly in five pound blocks. My grandmother gave me about 2 pounds of her government cheese, and I melted it over homemade bread with sauerkraut. It was a vegetarian Rueben that I would call a "Reagan", and it was a good sandwich.

Processed cheese may have originated in the US, so the nomenclature may be appropriate, but I've heard somewhere that in Canada, the same stuff is called "Canadian cheese"

I don't think that this is about millenials. Outside of McDonalds, I haven't had American cheese in years. Stores don't seem to sell it very much. We all have more sophisticated tastes than we used to. Forty years ago, nobody drank espresso or put sriracha on anything or knew what pesto is Somehow, blaming millennials gives this story legs.

But this whole idea that American cheese is "dying" is just nonsense. Sales of American cheese declined 1.6 per cent last year. That's al long way from death, metaphorical or otherwise. People die, animals die, but most things keep going. Greek Tragedies have declined since the days of Sophocles, but they haven't died. Somewhere in the world, a greek tragedy is being performed right now.

cognitivedissonance - 2018-10-14
It’s only CALLED “American cheese” due to 19th century cultural insecurity. Anytime we in America make a decent cheese, we name it after an existing cheese in Europe. We didn’t start naming cheeses ourselves until maybe twenty years ago.
blase - 2018-10-14
Millennials are getting too much credit for simply following consumer trends initiated by their predecessors... Whole Foods was founded in the 1980s, for example...
Old_Zircon - 2018-10-14
By a right wing, anti-union Texan no less, so it scooped them on irony too.

Old_Zircon - 2018-10-14
My first job was at one of the very first health food cooperatives in the USA, and we had a copy of the Simon and Schuster Pocket Guide to Cheese ca. 1988 or 89 in the back room by the cheese slicer for reference. It was organized by country, and if you went to the section for the USA it just had a short two or three sentence paragraph explaining that there was no such thing as American cheese, because there's no cheese that's native to the USA and American cheese itself isn't actually cheese.

Doesn't make it any less delicious.
betabox - 2018-10-14
It's revolting. It's like slightly tangy vinyl, only with more orange coloring.

Mr. Purple Cat Esq. - 2018-10-15
Ive noticed people who tend to go for really intense blue cheese (eg. Roquefort) Tend to be smokers or were smokers..

I think its reasonable to assume that people who prefer intense flavours have less sensitive taste buds.

SolRo - 2018-10-15
I like intense flavored foods and fermented foods. I’ve not smoked in any significant amount. It’s possible though that my sense of taste is dulled by the overflavored/salted processed food that’s omnipresent in the states.

SolRo - 2018-10-15
The other explanation is that adults have less sensitive sense of taste than kids and are more tolerant of intense flavors

John Holmes Motherfucker - 2018-10-16
>>>I think its reasonable to assume that people who prefer intense flavours have less sensitive taste buds.

Not necessarily. In 1980, I spent a summer in a farmhouse in Pennsylvania, where I had to drink my coffee black and unsweeted, and after I acquired the tastes I drank it that way for 20 years. I lost the taste after being introduced to latte and red bulls around 2000. Black coffee is more bitter than coffee with cream and sugar, but I can tell you that I could detect all kind of subtle flavors in black unsweetened coffee back then. i think that a love of strong flavors often goes hand in hand with refined tastes

i don't know what the neuroscience is regarding acquired taste, but I wouldn't assume that the change occurs in the mouth, instead of in the brain.

I love blue cheese on a salad or a burger, but does anyone really like blue cheese straight up?

Simillion - 2018-10-15
"The natural cheeses"
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